Stubbs, Walpole and Burke: Convulsive Imitation and ‘Truth Extorted’ - Tate Research Repository
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Stubbs, Walpole and Burke: Convulsive Imitation and ‘Truth Extorted’

2010

Abstract

This essay examines the relationship between George Stubbs’s Lion and Horse series of paintings and the redefinition of the sublime given by the philosopher Edmund Burke in his famous treatise of 1757. It argues that Stubbs sought to provide visual equivalents for Burke’s maximalist languages of neuro-physiological description of viewing experiences, exploring the visual implications of the novel concepts of sympathy, pain, contractility and expression in ways that help explain the unconventional intensity of his images.

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